Knight of Cups

Knight of Cups

By Terrence Malick

  • Genre: Terrence Malick
  • Release Date: 2016-05-06
  • Advisory Rating: 15
  • Runtime: 1h 58min
  • Director: Terrence Malick
  • Production Company: Waypoint Entertainment
  • iTunes Price: GBP 3.99
  • iTunes Rent Price: GBP 3.49
5.6/10
5.6
From 433 Ratings

Description

Rick is a screenwriter living in Los Angeles. While successful in his career, his life feels empty. Haunted and confused, he finds temporary solace in the decadent Hollywood excess that defines his existence. Women provide a distraction to his daily pain, and every encounter brings him closer to finding his place in the world. From Terrence Malick, the visionary director of The Tree of Life and To the Wonder, and starring Christian Bale (The Big Short, The Fighter, The Dark Knight Rises), Cate Blanchett (Carol, Blue Jasmine) and Natalie Portman (Black Swan, Thor), comes a stunning meditation on love, fate and fame.

Trailer

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Reviews

  • Depressing

    1
    By FixReviewers
    This film is beautifully shot total waste of your time, soul and dollars. Only buy, rent or watch if you've been smoking weed or very very lonely and bored
  • Genious

    5
    By Sick1234
    This is a very profound film on lots of levels and is deeply moving ,it combines fairytale with real life and because of this it is a truthful film that captures real life contemplations.reminds me of a modern day Tarkovsky brilliant!
  • Hiccups

    1
    By StueyH15
    What a lot of self-indulgent nonsense. With the exception of a few highly affective visual sequences that offer us beautiful and expansive landscapes (N.B. the focus is on that and not the protagonist), Knight Of Cups seems to be a lengthy perfume commercial focusing on the razor-thin importance of 21st century problems. Emotionally flimsy, laughably shallow, annoyingly nauseating camerawork - this is a film studies project with more expensive cameras and actors/resses. The ending of The Final Girls, a hammy comedic ode to eighties slasher movies, knocks this film out of the park with respect to visual appropriateness and "heart". Probably worth a look for those interested in making film i.e. a sense check of how an "artistic" work can get wrapped up in its own pretentiousness.

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